• Gentle, hands-on realignment
  • Acupuncture
  • Prolotherapy

Most sports injuries are soft tissue injuries involving muscles, tendons, and ligaments. These injuries often occur as a result of an acute trauma. They can also be a result of the wear and tear on an area from repetitive strain over time.

High School Sports injuries:

An injury to a high school athlete can be a significant disappointment for the teen, the family, and the coaches. When a sports injury occurs, it is important to quickly seek proper treatment. Injuries among young athletes fall into two basic categories: overuse injuries and acute injuries. Fortunately, both types usually respond rapidly to conservative care, including Osteopathic manipulation, acupuncture, or Prolotherapy. When the injury is severe, orthopedic care may be necessary.

College Sports Injuries:

College sports injuries can vary from short lived strains and sprains all the way up to catastrophic events. These can occur from an acute event, or simply overuse. 70 % of all college sports injuries are from acute events. For men, the highest injury rate occurs in football, where studies reveal an incidence of 35 significant injuries per 1000 players. For women, cheerleading is by far the most dangerous sport, accounting for 70 percent of female athletic catastrophic injuries. The high-flying routines create unique risks for cheerleaders.

30% of all college sports injuries are from overuse. These are most often from low-contact sports that involve long training sessions or where the same movement is repeated numerous times. These include stress injuries, inflammation, and tendonitis.

Fortunately, both acute events and overuse injuries usually respond rapidly to conservative care, including Osteopathic manipulation, acupuncture, or Prolotherapy. When the injury is severe, orthopedic care may be necessary.

Adult Sports Injuries:

More adults than ever are participating in sports. Many factors contribute to sports injuries as the body grows older. One contributing factor is that adults are often not as agile and resilient as they were when they were younger. In addition, some injuries occur when a person tries to move from being inactive to being more active too quickly. I see this most often in springtime, as my patients shift from indoor dormancy to more aggressive outdoor activities.

More women of all ages are participating in sports than ever before. In women’s sports, the action is now faster and more aggressive and powerful than in the past. As a result, women are sustaining many more injuries, and the injuries tend to be sport-specific.

Men are often injured by being “weekend warriors,” packing a week’s worth of activity into a day or two. Men are naturally competitive, and this can also lead to overdoing. Adult athletes can prevent most sports injuries by maintaining a moderate level of activity throughout the week, learning to play their sport correctly, using properly fitted and good quality equipment, and accepting their body’s limits. If you find yourself injured, I am here for you!